Cleveland Institute of Art Students Exhibit New Works

Visual art exhibition includes paintings, drawings and mixed media

Release Date: 10.29.2007

“Brave New World: Confronting the Unpredictable,” an exhibition of visual art produced by nine students from the Cleveland Institute of Art, will be shown at the offices of the Cleveland Foundation from Nov. 8, 2007, through Feb. 15, 2008. The exhibition is a collaborative project involving the foundation, the Institute of Art, and Case Western Reserve University.

The paintings, drawings and mixed-media works being shown incorporate elements of daily life in an exploration of modern culture and society’s reaction to its uncertain future. The artists use a variety of media, including charcoal, graphite powder, pen, colored pencils, oil and acrylic paint, and video.

“These students are products of their environment, and they reflect on such trends of our time as competition and diversity,” said curator Genny Boccardo-Dubey, a graduate student in art history at Case Western Reserve. “They convey feelings that are difficult to express in our ever-morphing society.”

An opening reception will be held Thursday, Nov. 8, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Cleveland Foundation (1422 Euclid Ave., Suite 1300, Cleveland). The public may view the exhibition by visiting the foundation’s offices Monday through Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Featured artists are Mike Abarca, Karl Anderson, Amanda Cates, Carla Fontecchio, Nick Gulan, Alex Katris, Melissa Spainhourd, Darius Steward, and Jessica Wheelock.

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Established in 1914, the Cleveland Foundation is the world’s first community foundation and the nation’s third-largest today, with assets of $1.9 billion and 2006 grants surpassing $85 million. The foundation improves the lives of Greater Clevelanders in perpetuity by building community endowment, addressing needs through grantmaking, and providing leadership on vital issues. Currently the foundation proactively directs two-thirds of its flexible grant dollars to the community’s greatest needs: economic transformation (including advanced energy and globalization), public school improvement, early childhood and youth development, neighborhoods and housing, and arts advancement.